24 health advices

Anxiety Symptoms


Title:

Anxiety Symptoms

Word Count:

511

Summary:

Anxiety is a part of everyday life in the new millennium. But for people, it expresses itself much worse than for others. Anxiety symptoms that go beyond the typical expressions of unease and nervousness should not be ignored. While many people can expect to suffer an anxiety attack at some point in their life, recurring episodes of extreme anxiety are definitely not normal.

Anxiety itself is good. It serves as the bodys warning system that something may be amiss; that we...

Keywords:

irritability,nervousness,stressful situations

Article Body:

Anxiety is a part of everyday life in the new millennium. But for people, it expresses itself much worse than for others. Anxiety symptoms that go beyond the typical expressions of unease and nervousness should not be ignored. While many people can expect to suffer an anxiety attack at some point in their life, recurring episodes of extreme anxiety are definitely not normal.

Anxiety itself is good. It serves as the body’s warning system that something may be amiss; that we need to move into a state of preparedness. Among these anxiety symptom are a rapid heartbeat, dry mouth and sudden perspiration. Surely nobody reading this has ever managed to escape those sensations.

But how many have been found themselves in stressful situations in which they became dizzy, grew short of breath, felt pain in their chest and a sudden need to urinate? While these are all common symptoms of everyday anxiety, if you find yourself feeling all of them, chances are you have gone beyond the norm and experiencing an actual anxiety attack. If you experience these symptoms on more than a few occasions, you may be to the point where you should consult a doctor.

Still, even these anxiety symptoms do not definitely mean you are experiencing an anxiety disorder. After all, the human body responds differently to varying situations of stress. For some people, the very thought of walking onto a stage and speaking to a large crowd of people would bring on all of the above symptoms without it necessarily indicating a disorder.

However, if in addition to the above, you also experience one or more of these anxiety symptoms, it is definitely past the point where you should at least be conducting some research. If you begin to experience deep feelings of apprehension, or even outright dread, of certain situations even when you are not anywhere near to being in those situations and you experience the physical symptoms, chances are you anxiety is to the point of a disorder. In addition, isolation of oneself from others can often be a sign of a more serious problem. Nervousness, jittery behavior, irritability, jumpiness; all of these are normal responses under certain circumstances, but if you notice a link between feeling them and either facing or just thinking about stress-inducing environments or events, it may be time to consider professional help.

Anxiety symptoms are a normal part of the day for most of us. Unless you get to work at your dream job and then go back to your dream home life, chances are you will experience a facing pulse, or a dry mouth today. It can be difficult to determine if the anxiety you are feeling is normal or something more. The worst thing to do is compare your reactions to anybody else; what may seem excessive to them might actually be normal for you. However, if you do find yourself experiencing these anxiety symptoms and you are concerned, definitely seek out the advice of friends and family to help locate the possible source of your anxiety.

Canada vs. Medicare




Canada vs. Medicare

Which is cheaper, getting your medication from Canada or signing up for the new Medicare Part D? Using the Medicare web site, I entered a variety of medications for five different “patients.” I then went to a couple of online Canadian pharmacy websites and compared prices using the same medications.

I was actually surprised when the results were tabulated. Medicare was less expensive in four out of the five “patients.” The five “patients” had five different quantities of prescriptions: one, two, four, six, and eight different prescriptions. The Canadian pharmacies added the cost of shipping. The Medicare plan added co-pays, deductibles, and monthly premiums. I chose the least expensive plan when I was given an option.

I was truly amazed when my fourth “patient,” taking six different medications, would save roughly $1,400 in 2006 by using Medicare Part D instead of Canada. The only “patient” that would not benefit is the one who only had one prescription. My opinion why this was true has to do with deductibles and monthly premiums. This emphasizes what I’ve said many times: if you spend less than $810 per year on your prescriptions, you will actually lose money by signing up for Medicare Part D.